ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Sex Differences in the Effects of Anxiety and Anxiety Sensitivity on Visual Perception
 
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1
Necmettin Erbakan University Meram School of Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Konya
2
Professor, Private Practice, İstanbul, Turkey
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Savaş Yılmaz   

Necmettin Erbakan Üniversitesi Meram Tıp Fakültesi Çocuk ve Ergen Psikiyatrisi Anabilim Dalı, 42090 Meram, Konya, Turkey
Publish date: 2016-01-16
 
Eur J Gen Med 2016;13(1):1–6
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Objective:
Most previous studies investigating the relationship between visual perception and anxiety have found that anxiety-provoking stimuli are perceived as relatively larger in size. Thus, the present study used neutral stimuli to investigate the relationships among anxiety, anxiety sensitivity (AS), and visual perception in a group of male and female university students.

Methods:
The Visual Size Perception Assessment Test (V-SPAT), which requires subjects to define a neutral figure in a dichotomous manner (i.e., tall/short, large/small, wide/narrow, crowded/deserted) was administered to all participants (n:76). Additionally, the anxiety level and AS of each participant was determined using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3), respectively.

Results:
The BAI and ASI-3 total and cognitive scores of female participants were correlated with perceptions of “deserted”, whereas their ASI-3 social scores were correlated with perceptions of “short”. The ASI-3 cognitive scores of male participants were correlated with perceptions of “crowded”, and their ASI-3 physical scores were correlated with perceptions of “tall”. The present findings indicate that the visual perception of neutral objects is correlated with anxiety and AS.

Conclusion:
Furthermore, these data revealed sex differences in the relationship between AS and visual perception in that males perceived the objects as larger and females perceived them as smaller.

eISSN:2516-3507